Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Upcoming Giveaway!





My son once jumped from the couch to the television and landed on the coffee table. I haven't owned one since that event. Don't ask me why. Today as I was walking through our living room it dawned on me that now that the kids are well past the toddler trends, I might be able to pull off having one around again. So, what the heck. Today is just as good a day as any to look for a coffee tables right? Have you ever been to http://www.allcoffeetables.com/ ? CSN Stores has over 200 online stores where you can find everything a coffee table to cookware. While we're at it, I realized that with the addition of visitors using the coffee table, I would probably do well to start thinking of the holiday cooking around the corner. Here's the scoop. Thanksgiving is coming up and I realized...someone would do well to have one of the Nesco 18 Qt. Non-Stick Roaster Oven things. Do you want to have one of these bad boys?. We'll be having a giveaway here on the blog very soon. Thanks to Cookware.com! Thanks guys. I'll be asking for your favorite tips for cooking a moist turkey this season. I already know the one about soaking it in 15 lbs of butter. I'm looking for light and healthy ideas my friends. The one I find most amazing and useful will get this Roaster oven. Does that sound fair? So, leave a comment with your idea and your first name at least. Tell your friends about it via face book, twitter or your sweet mouth. That works. I'll announce the winner October 1st, just after my next TV appearance on NBC 12 Phoenix, Valley Dish. So, you won't want to miss either one! Happy cooking.
There you go.

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

Two of my favorite ways to cook a moist turkey are: underground in a pit and on the grill. An old friend from New Zealand taught me how to cook the bird in the ground. By cooking a bird on the grill you may think that it will be dry. Not so. The recipe that I follow includes stuffing the cavity with an orange that has been sliced into quarters. Then in the last 30 minutes you glaze it with an orange bbq sauce. My family has enjoyed both of these birds over the years.
- Austin C.

Mom2BJM(Amy) said...

Well, it's not quite 15 lbs of butter, but we do make an herb butter and spread it around under the skin - it makes it awfully flavorful and moist as well. ANd thankfully, my hubby does most of the prepping of the turkey. I would LOVE to have that roaster pan!

Splendid Things said...

Well, Don't know how healthy this is but here is a link to a wonderful recipe that uses a buttered brown paper bag in which to cook the turkey. (I guess since you don't eat the bag it's not so unhealthy, right???) I have tried it before with a small turkey breast to feed a family of 4 and it was wonderful. Cheers~ Jeanette at thealldays(at)msn.com
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/11/thanksgiving-dinner-101-the-turkey.html

Meadowlark said...

I don't want to win one. Only because I HAVE one and it TOTALLY ROCKS! I made fun of the husband when he bought it for me, and eat my words every single major holiday. :)

Good luck to somebody!!!!
(OK, I would take a second one, but would probably give it to the vegetarian daughter in law. Just sayin')

Marylois said...

I always cook my turkey on its breast, that is breast side down. Then I cover it very securely with a foil tent. I don't have to add any butter or oil. I cook it until the meat is falling off the bones, about 20 minutes per pound at 350 degrees F. It doesn't make the pretty Norman Rockwell turkey but it tastes great and is very moist and tender and I get tons of gravy making juices.

Mary Lois

Heather Hunt said...

brine it, pat it DRY and then deep fry it! NOT light and healthy, but darn good eats!

Heather Hunt said...

And, I already have a roaster... and the fryer!

noemptychairs said...

Soak it in a heavily herbed brine for a day before cooking. Not original or exciting, but definitely the most tender way I've ever prepared a bird. Happy coffee table hunting. Kelly

Crystal said...

It is all about the brine! No extra fat needed, and brines are scientifically proven to add more moisture to the bird (through that whole osmosis thing!) Add your favorite herbs to your brine to infuse the turkey with more flavor and BAM! you have a moist, flavorful bird!

Crystal said...

It is all about the brine! No extra fat needed, and brines are scientifically proven to add more moisture to the bird (through that whole osmosis thing!) Add your favorite herbs to your brine to infuse the turkey with more flavor and BAM! you have a moist, flavorful bird!

Anonymous said...

Ok- I'm going to be honest...I've never cooked a turkey before. Yes, I've known my husband for 13 years and have been married for 8 years now, but we've always been with extended family for Thanksgiving and I haven't ever had to host it before...we travel there. However, since I am not so good at these giveaways (especially missing out on the last one), I am giving it my best shot. Here is a helpful article- http://www.chef2chef.net/articles/in-the-fire/how_to_bake_a_moist_turkey.html
Nicole B.

Julie K said...

I really love to brine the bird! I have added the spices right to the brine and then I also put spices and herbs in the cavity and under the skin. Then my husband will fire up the grill and "smoke" it. His family has never been turkey eaters at Thanksgiving because it was always dry. When I came into the family, all that changes. I would love to try the roaster this Thanksgiving. We searve about 25 people in shifts. My hoiuse is very small and people just crowd in to eat anywhere they can find a spot. I have always worried about this, but I was told this summer that everybody loves it. Feels just like home and the close quaarters, makes it special! What a great way to celebrate! I will no longer worry about the close quarters!

Kathy said...

I don't think I have ever cooked a turkey *Gasp*...and I don't even know what "brine" means...is that the same as marinate??...hello google. :)

Heffalump said...

Someone already took my tip so I guess I am out of the running!
I'd love to get one of those roasters so the oven would be free for pie and such while the turkey cooks. Also, my father in law uses one and the turkey seems to cook faster since it is in a smaller space.
I think using a combo of tips (brining and then cooking it breast side down) would make for a great turkey, although cooking it breast side down makes for a not pretty turkey. I wonder if it could be turned back to breast side up for the last hour so the skin could brown...

ToliB said...

I brine my turkey and top it with uncooked maple bacon. As it cooks, the bacon flavors the skin and keeps it moist. Also, the drippings make a wonderful gravy.

Lamb said...

My weird family uses Dr. Pepper....yes, Dr. Pepper to brine the turkey the night before roasting it. In the bottom of the roaster we always put a cup of the Dr Pepper, so the steam will help flavor the bird. And, we are of the *cook the stuffing separate* crew. Instead, family tradition is to cut up one Granny Smith apple in large chunks and get four pitted prunes and stuff those in the bird along with a sprig or two of rosemary.
Told ya my family was weird...but that turkey sure tastes yummy when done!
Enter me in the contest, too, please!

Lynn said...

I discovered Brine a few years ago and will not cook a turkey any other way. The brine makes is so tender and juicy. I did see a recipe for brined turkey with pineapple juice. I am going to try this. They say that this comes out very tender.
Would love one of these cookers so that they oven would be freed up for all of the other goodies.

Darkblue said...

I hate to sound like a broken record, but brining really does add flavor and moisture without adding fat (which I am totally sure you already knew!) I like to brine in a mixture of water, apple juice, peppercorns, rosemary, sage, allspice, candied ginger, salt, and cinnamon...the flavors soak in and make the turkey taste earthy and wonderful!

Catherine said...

I got married December 22 2001 and cooked my first Christmas Dinner ever 3 days later for my husband, father, and the in-laws. After the first few bites my husband loudly announced he didn't know Turkey tasted good because everyone he'd had before that had been as dry as cardboard and mine was moist and perfect! (Way to insult your Mom there dear Hubby!!!)

I put the turkey in a disposable foil pan, spray it with canola oil and season it and put it in the oven. Then I open the oven as little as possible until it is cooked. I don't baste it, if it starts to get to browned I will cover it with foil.

When you keep opening the door to check it and baste it your oven loses heat, so then you have to cook it longer and I think that's why it dries out.

This post is totally making me want to cook turkey now. Mmmm

pets @ critterhill . com

Darkblue said...

Oops! Forgot to leave my first name- Kelly :)

aswesow said...

It isn't amazing, and it's pretty obvious. Know where your food comes from. Start with a young, quality free range bird. Thaw it (if it is frozen)in the fridge. Basting is optional with a properly finished bird. Roast it on it's back (breast side up) until it is golden, then cover it with tin foil. Cook until the thickest part of the breast is 170 degrees. Don't undercook it, but dont over cook either. That is pretty much how to cook a turkey, but as I said in my opening, how the turkey spent its life (what it ate, how it was cared for, how much excersise it got...) that's what makes the difference between good turkey and great turkey!