Saturday, June 30, 2012

Chef Tess Country Sausage, Hash Brown and Pepper-Cheese Scrambled Egg Breakfast Skillet...(The 52 Jar Method Continues)

This meal in  a jar is too brilliant! You might pass out.  It's gluten free, just add water, and shelf stable 7-10 years.  It contains real sausage, potatoes, eggs, cheese, and vegetables. The thing I adore most of all about it is the fact that I don't have to plan on having any oil in the house to cook the hash browns. Yes. You read that correctly. No need to plan on extra oil in your food storage or cooking supplies anywhere. It's great for camping. It is all self-contained in the jar and ready to cook a meal. Are you excited to see the method?!
 If you're new to the 52 method meals in a jar you will need to see my Original Post on the safety of home vacuum-packing for long-term storage and convenience meals. Yes. that means you'll need to go here. I've had many follow-up posts on the  on the 52 Jar Method. Yes, the book is underway and the beginning bulk of recipes and outline for this food storage plan should be out in the cookbook I'm writing for Honeyville Farms. It will be published later this year. We are anticipating it hitting store shelves by December first.  In the meantime, because it is a Honeyville book, I am able to share the recipes here on the blog as long as I have some new and original ones in the book. I shared this with our Breakfast Meal-in-a-Jar classes and it was so well received by all who tasted it that I'm certain that it is indeed a winner.
I keep the egg mixture separate from the potato mixture, since eggs take about 3 minutes to cook and hash browns need to be hydrated and cook with the sausage for 15 minutes.  
The first "must-have" for this meal to be amazing is the Ova Easy Egg Crystals. They cook up to taste just like a fresh scrambled egg. I've ranted about them in the past but just know that we are very picky about eggs around here, as only a chef could be...and they are outstanding.  One #10 can is right around 29$. At first that freaked me out until I realized that there were 72 eggs in a can. So that's about 6 a dozen. 6 dozen! Shelf stable and not going to kill my family from salmonella. Yup. I'm a fan.
With the eggs we'll be using the beautiful technology of...
Freeze Dried Cheese.  Yes. It tastes like cheese, cooks like cheese and works like cheese. It IS cheese. The only ingredient in the can is cheese.
I'm also using the real  Sausage . It is shelf stable 10 years or more and remarkable. In this recipe it is NOT okay to use the TVP sausage. It will not work for keeping your hash browns from sticking to the pan the way the real stuff does.
I'm not going to lie...this stuff is delicious.
Please be very careful to use an oxygen absorber for these jars. With the use of the eggs and the freeze dried sausage they are not optional. They are for your safety.  Now...to the Oxygen Absorber. What do they do?
Wikipedia says: "An oxygen absorber is a small packet of material used to prolong the shelf life of food. They are used in food packaging to prevent food color change, to stop oils in foods from becoming rancid, and also retard the growth of oxygen-using aerobic microorganisms such as fungi...
Oxygen supports the growth of microorganisms and causes changes in color and rancid odors in packaged foods. Plastic packaging is less able to exclude oxygen from packaged foods than are the older glass and metal containers. Oxygen absorbers absorb oxygen and effectively reduce the aerobic environment to 0% oxygen. Therefore aerobic bacteria and fungi are unable to grow in this environment. This will extend the shelf life of a food product for years. The advantages of oxygen satchels versus vacuum packaging are that the food products are not crushed or squeezed, as some products are of high value and are fragile, and its simplicity of use."
Yes I use them. There is an alternate method using a jar attachment and a Food Saver vacuum machine...but today, this is what you get to see. I get my oxygen absorbers from my favorite website for supplies,  Here.
Are you ready for breakfast yet?!
 Chef Tess' Country Sausage, Hash Brown and
 Pepper-Cheese Scrambled Egg Breakfast Skillet
Wide mouth quart jar:
2 c Honeyville diced dehydrated potatoes
1 c Honeyville Freeze Dried Sausage (no substitutions)
1tsp Chef Tess All Purpose Seasoning
Small sealable baggie on top of potatoes and sausage in the jar:
1/3 c OvaEasy egg crystals (no substitutions)
1/3 c Honeyville freeze dried cheddar cheese
1/3c Honeyville freeze dried bell peppers
2T Honeyville freeze dried mushrooms
½ tsp Chef Tess Romantic Italian Seasoning

Top with an oxygen absorber (see the package of the oxygen absorber packets for specific safety on how long those are good out in the air). Seal lid on tightly, screwing on very securely. Make sure the oxygen absorber is not over the lip of the jar or you will not achieve a good seal. Jar lid will "pop" when the jar is sealed, after about 20 minutes. This is how you will know there is not any oxygen in your jar.
Directions to prepare Meal: In a large 12 inch non-stick skillet, combine the potatoes and sausage with 4 cups boiling water. Cover and allow hydrating 10-15 minutes until potatoes are tender.Drain any extra water, once the potatoes are tender. The fat from the sausage will keep the potatoes from sticking to the pan. Cook 10-15 minutes over medium heat, stirring once or twice but allowing the potatoes to brown well.  The secret is not stirring too often.  In separate quart-size bowl, combine the contents of the egg baggie with 2/3 cup cool water, whisking well. Allow to hydrate 5 minutes. In a small separate non-stick skillet on low heat, slowly cook the egg mixture, stirring often. Or, you can cook them in a corner of the skillet that the potatoes are in by simply pushing the hashbrown mixture to one side. Serve eggs over the potato mixture. Yield 5 servings. Equal to 3/4 cup sausage hash brown mixture and 1/5 egg mixture (about 1 egg).

There you go! A Country Breakfast fit for a king. Enjoy!

Always My Very Best,
Your Friend Chef Tess

I am no longer the corporate chef for Honeyville but we still love them dearly. My family is greatly blessed and relies heavily on the extra money brought in by sales tracked back to this site. This is also the company that packages and sells my spice line as well as my food storage cookbooks. Thank you so very much for your support. Xoxo!

30 comments:

Mama Peck said...

This looks yummy! Love this idea!

Blooming Mommy said...

I love your ideas! Also, do you know if the brand Thrive adds anything to their products or is it natural like honeyville? Just wondering. Now Im off to explore more of your wonderful site! Thanks for sharing! :)

Holly/Shelfreliance said...

YUM!!! I am excited to give this a try! You always come up with the best tasting ideas, Stephanie.

I can put in a vote of confidence regarding Thrive for Blooming Mommy. No preservatives needed for freeze dried foods =).

tidwell said...

how many does it one jar feed.

Nancy said...

Wouldn't the vacuum sealer attachment on the Foodsaver work the same way as the oxygen absorber?

Nancy said...

Never mind. I see that you addressed the Food Saver vacuum attachment in the March 31st entry.

Anonymous said...

I am intrigued, having just come across your blog today. Just a few questions though, my son is dairy free, I am gluten free and I am feeding three husky teenage boys. I am afraid that a jar of food that feeds only four won't quite cut it and would hate to have to open a second jar and then have leftovers. How do you address these issues?

Chef Tess said...

This meal feeds 5 or more. You can omit the cheese and it is dairy free. I have fed samples to groups of 60 plus people using only one jar and had plenty left over. I guess the only way to be sure is to try them and see. I know we get a lot of food once it it hydrated. You'll be surprised.

Cari K. said...

What size oxygen absorber do you use in these jars?

Chef Tess said...

300 cc oxygen absorber.

KJewelry.net said...

I cannot eat any food with preservatives, sulfites or nitrates. Would be interested in contacting Honeyville for ordering from. Do they have a website?

Chef Tess said...

http://honeyvillegrain.com

dawn said...

do you seal the baggie in the jar ? I was thinking that if you sealed it there might still be oxygen in the bag that the absorber doesn't reach. Thanks in advance for answering.

Jessie Allyn Woods said...

I haven't done vacuum pack canning ---or any type of canning---so I just wanted to clarify, I don't need to vacuum pack these, I just need to use an oxygen absorber? Thanks!

Chef Tess said...

Jessie,
Yes. Just an oxygen absorber will work. It makes it a vacuum environment. OR you can use a vacuum attachment on a Food Saver that is made for jars. If you look at the rest of the posts on the meals in a jar I cover all that you need to know. It's actually very simple and easy to do. xoxo!

Jessie Allyn Woods said...

Awesome, Thanks!

Angel Wings Photography said...

I am new to your Blog! I can not wait to read more :)

How many jars will i need for the scrambled egg breakfast skillet. Do you know about the cost per jar? Do you make these because of portion control?
Thank you!

Julie said...

I've been following your blog for a while now and am really interested in the 52 jar method. I finally found a place that sells sample sizes of freeze dried or dehydrated veggies and will be trying a few recipes to see if we like them. I'm still looking for sample sizes of the freeze dried meats, but will do the best I can with adding canned products. For your newer recipes, does your book have the amounts needed for each recipe for 10-12 jars?

Chef Tess said...

Julie,
The new book will have a little more on how much each can of product will make. In general, the FD meat will make 10-12 meals if the meal calls for 1 cup of meat. If it calls for less, or you make the meals in pint size jars instead of quarts, it will go much further.

Beth said...

Mabye I don't entirely understand oxygen absorbers, but if you seal the baggie before putting it inside the jar, will the oxygen absorber absorb the oxygen in the baggie as well. or do you not seal the baggie to begin with?

Krista said...

I am also wondering if you need to seal the Baggie! Please address this! Thanks!

Chef Tess said...

The plastic is porous enough that it is fine to seal and put in the jar if you're worried about it spilling over. Generally I just twist the top a little and it is fine. That is why it is safe to use inside with something else, but not alone as the main container for food for longer-term storage.

Tessa O. said...

How many people do these recipes feed???

Chef Tess said...

Very bottom of the recipe in bold. 5 servings. That's about the normal for us. This one has served a good size sample to classes with well over 50 students!

Anonymous said...

So looking forward to trying this meal! I just have one question. The recipe itself says cheddar cheese, but the cheese pictured is colby? So which is it? I've already ordered colby, so hopefully that will be okay!

Chef Tess said...

Yes, you can use colby or cheddar. Both will work. Great question.

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef, could you use a plastic jar instead of a mason jar or does it have to be glass? Thanks for your blog!

Chef Tess said...

If it is a weight issue, use a mylar bag (they are air-proof bags made with aluminum outer lining and plastic inside. Plastic bottles can only be used if they are the PET containers and only with the metal (with the rubber gasket) lid not the plastic lid.

Anonymous said...

Can we use tho other egg powder from Honeyville? If not, why?

Chef Tess said...

The whole egg powder, though good, isn't really designed for making scrambled eggs and is better suited for baking. Ova-Easy (you can also get from Honeyville) are crystalized in a totally different process, and are better suited for any egg use where you want a fresh egg taste (like scrambled eggs and omelets).