Thursday, February 12, 2009

Seeded Bread Tutorial.

Here Chickie, Chickie...get your seeds here...
Ever wondered how to get a gorgeously ultra seeded loaf that holds onto the seeds and has that flavor and crunch you want? This is the tutorial. Are you giddy excited yet?! Oats, sesame seeds, poppy seeds. All three will be here today, though you can use flax, sunflower, cornmeal (yea I know cornmeal is not a seed, but corn is a seed see?!). I used the overnight started bread recipe for this one. All the way through to the loaf molding . That recipe will only make two loaves. I made three but did 1 1/2 times the recipe. If that much math confused you, do two loaves only. I don't want to hurt your brain. To the standard size loaf pans I lightly oil and then put some oats, sesame seeds, or poppy seeds on the bottom/sides of the pan...

Then of course I tip it on it's side and take a funky picture. Saaaaweeeet.

Put a healthy dose of seeds on the counter top. Yea. It's like 1/2 a cup spread out.


Take your gorgeously formed loaf (loaf molding ...remember?)

Turn on the faucet with a nice smooth stream of water...and pick up that dough.

Hold the loaf securely and give it a good shower. Just a few seconds will do the trick.

Not like a shower for my 9 yr. old, a few seconds won't...most definitely won't do the trick!! Too many cracks and crevices that smell like a little stinky boy. He's cute, but stinky.Oh yea, don't use soap on your bread dough. Don't do it.


Put that really wet dough on the seeds and turn it over a couple of times to coat it really good. Why don't I use egg wash? I don't know. I just don't like it as much. Don't ask me those questions.


Oh my gracious heart. Don't laugh, but this next picture reminds me of a bad worm movie I saw in the 80's. I can't even remember what it was called, but Kevin Bacon was in it, and these killer giant worms...well they would eat people. So, OKAY. This bread is revenge. We eat it. For the record, you don't get worms from eating this bread. Well, now that was random. Shocking I know. I'm random. Shoot me.


Put that fabulously seeded wormy bread in the oiled, seeded loaf pan. I transfer mine to an unheated oven and spray them generously with more water. Close the door. Allow to raise. They took about an hour, then I gently removed them from the oven and lined them up like this...

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. After it is heated, take a sharp knife and slit the tops a little. On the poppy seed one, I did this cool "tri-slit". Not 100% sure if that is a word though.


The Sesame seeds look especially elegant this evening, don't you agree?

Bake 425 degrees 20 minutes, lower to 350 degrees and finish baking. This is usually 15-20 minutes. (170-175 degrees internal temp with a meat thermometer) Love it!!

There you go. Oh, and is totally customary, send one loaf to me.

6 comments:

Angela said...

Those look delicious! I'll have to try that, too! I'm not much on gourmet, but you're inspiring me by making it look easy!

And I remember that movie--I think it was "Tremors" with the big worms underground in the desert . . .

Chef Tess said...

Yes! Yes! Yes!! I am so happy I am inspiring you! It is easy! I do remember it was called Tremors! Thanks!

Anonymous said...

So after much trepidation I pulled the 'sponge' from my bathroom this morning, the coldest room in our house. It was probably 58 max all night long... My sponge wasn't as light and fluffy as yours, and I almost threw it out this morning. But since I had gotten that far, I decided to forge ahead. I have never let my bread rise as many times as you direct. Why? I always thought. Well, now I know. Because determined to make your bread I did it just like you directed. Never have I tasted 100% whole wheat bread (not store bought) that was light and fluffy! I just never thought it was possible! This bread is YUMMO! yes, you heard me. You get a YUMMO! Light and soft! and whole wheat...I didn't think it was possible. Is it the sponge thing or the rising and forming the loaves like you do, and not using a floured counter but a water sprayed one? I gotta get some 8x4 loaf pans.... Thanks or your guidance and for sharing your skills!

Chef Tess said...

I am so excited! Thank you for sharing your success, as that encourages me to keep doing these posts!

clan of the cave hair said...

Cheff Tess! 1 question, 1 request.

1st...how important is "proofing the yeast". Does it serve a purpose other than proving the yeast is alive?

2nd. Once upon a time you mentioned a recipe you make with cocoa mix...the kind you buy in 10 lb cans at the cannery. Care to share? I have an open can and we don't drink much cocoa. I'm at a loss as to how to use it otherwise.

Chef Tess said...

Proofing the yeast. The main purposes are to get the yeast going, and yes, to see if it is alive. I have found that if I have used the yeast in the last week it isn't entirely necessary to activate it first. There is an actual method (called the straight dough method) that you don't activate the yeast, just put everything together and start the dough that way. I have several recipes that use that particular method.
Cocoa mix from the church cannery I use is chocolate cream pie. I am doing a recipe for that this week on here...funny that you mentioned it. I posted pictures of it on FB last week. I'll get that one to you. It makes amazing pie and pudding. It is also very nice in chocolate sourdough cake. I can do that one as well. Yea, it goes without saying that we don't drink much cocoa here either, it just isn't cold enough in AZ long enough to drink it hot very often. However I do mix it up and put it in the fridge. My kids love chocolate milk and would drink it all day if I let them.